The 9/11/10 Ground Zero Mosque Protest – Protest Review

This Woman Supported the Mosque Until She Discovered it Wasn't a 1994 Jim Carrey Film.

I think everyone remembers where they were on the 9th anniversary of 9/11, mainly because it was a mere three days ago. While the original 9/11 was debatably the day that dictated a decade and defined a generation, last Saturday was a much more divisive deceitful affair rooted in distasteful destruction and disrespectful dismissals. Of course, that’s just one man’s perspective. How do I know? Because that one man…was ME! Yes, with all the hoopla over the potential Islamic Cultural Center or, as it’s inaccurately known, the “Ground Zero Mosque,” heating up cable television around the clock, I decided to interject myself right into the thick of things and experience the insanity first hand. Oh, and did I mention I brought my camera? Well, I did, and here’s a glimpse into just another day in New York City:

Those are the final moments of the protest. This was taken at the site of the Pro-Mosque Rally after the Anti-Mosque Rally was forced to disband by police, so the Anti-Mosque Rally’s most vocal participants (still looking for clouds to yell at) decided to crash the party and engage in a debate series of loud angry noises in-between other progressively louder angrier noises. Both sides of the issue seem to be engaging in some Pantaphysics-based call-and-response where the rebuttals have no regard for lack the slightest hint of acknowledging whatever it is they’re responding to. You’ll notice one gentleman seems to believe the whole fandango was a masterminded coup to embarrass Donald Trump.

I like to keep this site as apolitical as possible since we all know new-millennium Politics + Hip-Hop = BOR-ING, but as an objective viewer and lover of the absurd, this just had to be commented on. One thing that strikes me about the whole controversy is how transparently racist the whole shebang is. If you really listen to the Anti-Mosque Brigade, you never once hear the phrase “radical Islam.” Instead, they refer to the actions of a select few fundamentalists as “the middle east.” What also gets me is that, if the more vocal proponents in the press are anything to go by, the same sect who demand the Ten Commandments be posted in public schools. That’s not to say I’m likening the “Ground Zero Mosque” to the separation of Church-and-State, rather I question the justification of fighting for a religious presence in a government-regulated building while denying the right of freedom of religion to the independent individual enterprise that makes America great.

What it all boils down to is that this was a protest against Islam and Muslims in general. The well-documented actions of Saturday, including protesters dressing up like the Dutch Mohammad cartoon and burning the Koran/Qur’an/Harmony Korine, isn’t so much saying “I don’t want a House of Islam that close to a location where a horrible act was carried out by a very minuscule radical offshoot of it” but “I want Muslims to know that they are not welcome here, and I do not respect them.” Did it not cross their mind that perhaps there are some Muslims in New York City who *gasp* might be on the same side that they are?

I was in Minnesota when the story broke, and after spending time there and in North Carolina, I’ve noticed there’s been a great deal of inaccurate reporting on it. For one, the “Mosque” ISN’T IN GROUND ZERO. I think what’s confused a lot of people is that when the original rebuilding of the World Trade Center in 2006 began, there was a non-denominational prayer center in the middle of it. That plan was scrapped and construction was ceased/demolished, as well as another time, making this next rebuilding effort the THIRD ATTEMPT to fill that wound left nine years ago. But I degrassi, the “Mosque” is roughly TWO AVENUE BLOCKS AWAY! It takes over 15 minutes to walk there from Ground Zero, and is really nowhere near it. If people are really concerned with the desecration of a sacred place, why isn’t there more of an effort to rid the area of the subhuman scum who sell 8 X 10″ glossy photos of the towers exploding or commemorative “Never Forget” T-Shirt and plate sets? Or how about using this angry energy to help the immediate on-site volunteers who still need medical help?

While the protest did have a dedicated and vocal turnout, no real dialogue was started. Oh, there were words exchanged from different parties, but there were merely a series of monologues that occasionally intersected each other. While things didn’t escalate into violence, they often felt like they were about to. If a statement was made, it’s that people disagree on an issue and love to relish in it in front of a crowd. While they have gotten some attention, they really haven’t done anything with it. This protest was basically a 2000s mixtape rappers career in a day.

We Give The 9/11/10 Ground Zero Mosque Protest a Two Out of Five

So until next time…let’s agree to agree!

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2 Comments on “The 9/11/10 Ground Zero Mosque Protest – Protest Review”

  1. cinestina barnburner Says:

    POTATO SACK RACES FOR ALL!!!

    best line ever.

  2. Loc Says:

    The Mohammad cartoon that created all the buzz was Danish, not Dutch.
    Love the blog.


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